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7 ::  R. Tannenbaum
His is an interesting story. Ronnie came to me from southern California where he is a citrus farmer and an off-trail ultra back packer. This guy likes to do 200-250 miles in 10 days or so, mostly off trail. Crazy! However, his feet were limiting him. He had three complaints with his feet: severe blisters in both heels, blistering on the joints of the big toes, and severe pain and pressure under the balls of the feet. Ronnie had tried everything and was afraid that he was going to have to find another passion. His visit with me was a last ditch effort.

The evaluation showed that he had tibial varum (bow legged) plus a forefoot/rear foot varus deformity, excessive pronation and about 1-1 ˝ sizes difference between the two feet. He came expecting a custom boot that would hopefully solve his problems. What I suggested was custom orthotics and that he buy two pairs of boots in different sizes to fit his feet.

Ronnie had learned how to deal with and treat his blisters successfully. I taught him what was going on bio-mechanically and what all that had to do with the way he walked, with how the force was carried through his feet, and what we needed to do to correct the issue. Here is a photo and letter that I received a few months later.



Randy:

Maybe not the sole reason but a significant contributor. The 250-mile jaunt (longer than planned, but more on that in a moment) was, as far as my feet were concerned, a walk in the park (actually 2-kings & Yosemite.) Maybe not the ultimate test but certainly up there with a huge amount of cross-country and a lot of nasty talus. By the end of the hike my boots were in need of repair-new soles and some stitching-but my feet were as good as new.

No blisters, pain on the balls of my feet, or any other ailments. The only problem was blisters on the balls of my feet after I ended up doing 45 miles over 2 days, some of that in the dark, when I had some problems at my resupply (the reason for the longer than planned hike.) I was able to vanquish these blisters through judicious care throughout the balance of the hike.

The 250-mile jaunt (longer than planned, but more on that in a moment) was, as far as my feet were concerned, a walk in the park (actually 2-kings & Yosemite.)

Maybe not the ultimate test but certainly up there with a huge amount of cross-country and a lot of nasty talus. By the end of the hike my boots were in need of repair-new soles and some stitching-but my feet were as good as new. No blisters, pain on the balls of my feet, or any other ailments. The only problem was blisters on the balls of my feet after I ended up doing 45 miles over 2 days, some of that in the dark, when I had some problems at my resupply (the reason for the longer than planned hike.) I was able to vanquish these blisters through judicious care throughout the balance of the hike.

I give you major credit for my lack of foot problems. Obviously, the orthotics you made, and your subsequent diagnosing of the need to raise one of the arches, were a big factor. I think just as important is you take an approach that examines the whole immediate environment surrounding the feet. In fact the understanding you gave me of what to be aware of in terms of fitting and construction when I bought new boots was significant. As was the suggestion that I go to SmartwoolŽ socks to minimize moisture, and use clean socks each day. So, while I was pushing things close to the limit, my feet didn't limit me.

This was in incredible hike with few (or no) people, even on the trail parts. Fantastic scenery. If you decide to do some hiking in the Sierras, parts of this route are definitely at the top of my list.

Any time you want a testimonial of your work, count me in. I'm incredibly pleased that you were able to help me, and achieve what I count as a 100% success. Thanks.

Ronnie
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